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Título:
TANIC

Title:
 

Autor(es):
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Autor(es): ICKIS, JOHN CATHER; EDELBERG, GUILLERMO S; MORALES RODRIGUEZ, MARIO

Fuente del inglés:
JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, VOL.50, ISSUE 1, OCT., 2000, P.123-137 (DOC-01647)

Fuente del español:
 

País(es)
NICARAGUA

Materia(s):
CIGARRILLOS; TABACO--INDUSTRIA Y COMERCIO; EMPRESAS INTERNACIONALES DE NEGOCIOS; EMPLEADOS--REPRESENTACION (ADMINISTRACION); PRODUCCION--ADMINISTRACION

Resumen:
Typical of many subsidiaries and joint ventures with multinationals in Central America through the 1980s, TANIC operated over the years in Nicaragua with considerable autonomy from its parent, British American Tobacco. It was largely self-sufficient, obtaining raw materials from local producers, manufacturing, and selling in the domestic market. Globalization was a distant and abstract concept. When Miguel Trivelli arrived in Nicaragua from Chile to become general manager of TANIC in 1995, this situation was rapidly changing. In response to new policy initiatives, the sourcing of raw materials for Central American subsidiaries had been concentrated in Guatemala and Honduras. A regional office had been established in Costa Rica, communications technology had become standardized, and such functions as purchasing and training were becoming centralized. There was even some discussion of closing the less efficient plants. This process of rationalization, now familiar to multinational subsidiaries operating in more open economies, posed a clear threat to TANIC operations, which had recently suffered quality problems and could have become a candidate for closure. Mr. Trivelli is faced with the challenge of increasing quality and productivity in a difficult environment, impoverished by decades of civil strife and economic crisis. The case centers around Mr. Trivelli's decision to introduce a new organizational scheme, the "mini-factory," in the TANIC plant. The scheme is based on self-motivated work teams that operate their own businesses, obtaining inputs from other mini-factories and selling to internal clients. The skeptic can identify numerous reasons why the scheme is destined to fail: workers have low educational levels; they are accustomed only to receiving orders; supervisors and mechanics will offer strong resistance; and managers will oppose the idea.

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