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Título:
CARRIER MEXICO S.A. DE C.V.

Title:
 

Autor(es):
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Autor(es): TROSTEL, ALBERT O; LIGHT, ANDREW

Fuente del inglés:
JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, VOL.50, ISSUE 1, OCT., 2000, P.97-110

Fuente del español:
 

País(es)
MEXICO

Materia(s):
AIRE ACONDICIONADO; NEGOCIOS--PLANEAMIENTO; EMPRESAS INTERNACIONALES DE NEGOCIOS; ADMINISTRACION; PROGRAMACION DE LA PRODUCCION

Resumen:
The market for air conditioners is changing in Latin America. Consumers with greater purchasing power demand window units of differing sizes and capacities. These are being sold through new, mass distribution channels such as Sears and Wal-mart. This case involves the attempts of one manufacturer, Carrier, to respond to these changes by introducing a new "product delivery system" (PDS) that would enable the company plant to produce all models of window air conditioner each week. Carrier de Mexico, though a subsidiary of a U.S.-based multinational, is very much a Mexican company. It was founded with the purchase of a distributor in the northern city of Monterrey, and the subsequent merger with another Mexican company. Since that merger, there have been nine plant consolidations and a reduction from four factories to one. Manufacturing space was reduced by 32% while production increased by 38%. At the time of the proposed change to PDS, the company was still absorbing the changes of recent years that had been guided by a philosophy of kaizen or continuous improvement. As consultants, the company had hired a group of exToyota employees who had developed their own version of kaizen, which was carried out through events in which radical change was produced. The new challenge facing the company was to supply the new mass merchandising channels with a full variety of window air conditioners, which was particularly difficult during the peak summer months. Company practice had been to produce long runs of each model, thus reducing setup times but increasing inventories. The adoption of a weekly mixedmodel delivery schedule would necessitate significant changes both within the company and in supplier relations. However, it is no longer a matter of whether Carrier de Mexico (CMX) would adopt PDS, which was being pushed both by Latin American Operations in Miami and Global Manufacturing at company headquarters.

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